Hikayat Exhibition

Dania-Hany

Dania-Hany

Mahmoud Alhaj - Fragile

Mahmoud Alhaj - Fragile

1-02

1-02

Photo_Workers’ Beds for the Night, The A

Photo_Workers’ Beds for the Night, The A

by William Andersen

Simon Haddad

Youssef Itani

Leila Mnekbi

Hala Al Taher's "From The Diaspora to Their Homeland"

  • Instagram


Hala Al Taher is a Palestinian - Jordanian multidisciplinary artist who is currently developing a postcard project that is aimed at showing and emphasizing the diversity of Palestinians that are in the diaspora.

 

"I got in contact with people within the Palestinian diaspora. I made them write down their wishes in their handwriting as a method of realizing their desires and expressing them through the lost communication form of postcards. To make the world see our longing and desire to return to our homeland"

"The Keeper" de Shuruq Harb

  • Instagram

 

Pour son premier solo institutionnel au Beirut Art Center, Shuruq Harb développe de nouvelles itérations et étendues d'œuvres récentes et de recherche. Au cœur de l'exposition se trouve un questionnement autour de la matérialité, de la conservation et de la circulation. L'une des œuvres qui sera exposée est The Keeper, une installation de 2000 images dont l'artiste a hérité d'un vendeur ambulant de Ramallah en 2010. Les images sont les vestiges d'une vaste archive réunie par Mustafa, qui a collecté des photographies en ligne pour impression et vente dans les rues de Ramallah.

Tu Manling’s Cultural Tours between Egypt and Kuwait 

  • Instagram

Manling travels across Kuwait and Egypt, capturing photographs that portray diverse cultures and celebrations.

Dania Hany's ' I Have Been Here Before'

  • Instagram

I Have Been Here Before (2018 – ongoing) is an attempt to mend the distance between the past and the present. When faced with the decision to leave, home is no longer a tangible space but a notion that moves back and forth between the present and the past, and between personal and inherent memory.

 

"Living between Egypt and Turkey, I felt little connection to my roots, until I learned about the displacement of my ancestor, Ali Pasha Hilmi, from the Caucasus"

Mahmoud Alhaj's 'Fragile series '-Supported by A.M. Qattan Foundation

  • Instagram

Mahmoud Al Haj is a Palestinian visual artist and arts teacher.  Responding to the conflict in Gaza, the works from his “Fragile” series employ empty blister sheets from various medications. Superimposed with images of buildings and open windows, the sheets themselves take on a sculptural quality and exhibit deeply rooted pain and anxiety in war-torn urban centers. 

William Andersen's

'Workers’ Beds for the Night'

  • insta

William Andersen’s artwork and point of view have been primarily influenced by his travels between the US and Asia over the last two decades. During this time, he has watched as regions like the Middle East and East Asia have emerged as economic and cultural forces and is fascinated by the tightening global web of economics, resource use, migration, and cultural hybridization. 

 

Line Itani's 'Ménage avec la Mort'

  • Instagram

 

Confinée à Grasse, Line plonge dans la pensée bachelardienne. Dans un jeu de clair-obscur tant en mots qu'en images, elle se réfléchit, réfléchit ses compagnons de huis clos, ainsi que pense la mort physique et morale que la pandémie et la vie promettent. 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Confined in Grasse, Line plunges into Bachelardian thought. In a game of clair-obscur both in word and image, she reflects on herself, her huis clos mates, as well as both the pandemic and life's promise of physical and moral death. 

Leila Mnekbi's 'Beirut by Night' 

  • Instagram

"I am struck by how a year has already passed. Beirut is a city where I have grown and outgrown my limits, it taught me how to live and embrace circumstances as they are and the nightlife was the first stepping in that process. I was amazed at how this concept shifted in meaning and place during the revolution, and how it kept the essence of compassion, sharing and community." 

 

 Leila Mnekbi invites us to see 'Beirut by Night' throughout the October revolution.

Janna Karam and Thea Moussa's Art Piece for Beirut

  • Instagram

Jana Karam and Thea Moussa are two lebanese expat students and artists. Following the explosion that ravaged Beirut on the 4th of August 2020, they both felt compelled to do something in an attempt to help Lebanon from abroad. The oil painting they created and titled “18:08”, is one which is meant to represent the despair that Lebanese people have been living in. The eye watching the explosion shows almost no emotion because the true sentiment of the people can be depicted as numb and nearly dead on the inside. The colors were deliberately chosen to represent the lebanese flag and even subtle details were added to remind the public of Beirut.

Simon Haddad's Cry of a Nation 

  • Instagram

Torn amid economic and infrastructural crises, devastated Lebanese citizens rose against a system crumbling under its own weight.  Marches and cries spread across public spaces to voice out the great discontent towards the ruling system. Lebanese citizens of all ages began to challenge the status quo, further empowering the new generation to fight for a brighter and righteous future. "The Cry of a Nation" represents  the beginning of the October 17th Lebanese Revolution.

Hussam Halawa's #Zupperman

  • Instagram

#Zupperman is the creation of Syrian self taught photographer and stylist Hussam Halawa. Refusing to give in to self-pity, Zupperman is an ironic take on daily refugee life in Lebanon. Despite his Zupper powers, this Syrian anti-hero always ends up doing lousy jobs, is mistaken for a terrorist or simply lands on the wrong beach. Humor remains his biggest weapon to fight classic conventions and
prejudices.

Youssef Itani's Contested Landscapes

  • Instagram

Witnessing the landscape is a matter of subjective reflection, it branches from an emotional attitude that society develops towards landscapes, places, and sites. Beirut is a site of competing and contrasting discourses. The uprising of October 17th 2019 has unleashed a side of Lebanese people that has long been repressed. People are reclaiming their lost contested landscape through their vocal and physical presence.

Alexander Durie's Lebanese Dreams

  • Instagram

Journalist and photographer Alexander Durie took these pictures over a two-month period in Lebanon in the summer of 2019. Though Alexander’s visual work remains eclectic, he finds inspiration in using the photographic format to experiment with composition and lighting as well as challenging general stereotypes of a people or a place.